Alcohol advertising online advertising is booming, according to new data

The U.S. advertising industry is booming with ad sales on alcohol, according the latest Nielsen data, and that includes alcohol advertising online.

The ad market is up 15 percent over last year, according a Nielsen report.

The data from Nielsen, a division of the Nielsen Co., show the average ad price for online alcohol advertising is $2.18.

Nielsen said the industry’s growth has been fueled by digital platforms that have allowed advertisers to tap into their audience in a way that they have never done before.

The growth of online alcohol ads, however, has not been as dramatic as that of traditional TV advertising, which grew 20 percent in the past 12 months, according this report from Reuters. 

More than 40 percent of alcohol ad buyers are online, and many are buying ads in places where people already buy alcohol, such as online bars and restaurants.

The U-turn for online advertising comes amid concerns over alcohol abuse in American society.

In June, a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that the rate of alcohol-related deaths increased nearly 40 percent between 2000 and 2016.

The report noted that there were more than 12,000 deaths from alcohol poisoning in 2016.

It also noted that more than half of those deaths occurred in the United States, which is the country with the most alcohol-impaired deaths. 

In 2017, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) released a report that found that, over the past five years, the number of alcohol deaths in the U.M. was up by over 2,500. 

The NIAAA said the increase is mostly the result of a surge in alcohol-dependent individuals in the population.

They’re also being overdiagnosed, which can make them more likely to get alcohol poisoning and potentially develop liver problems. 

This report from the AP notes that the increase in alcohol advertising has been especially strong in the early part of the year.

It said that the average price for a 1,000-barrel sale of beer jumped 30 percent from July 1 to July 4.

The average price of a 2,000 barrel sale rose 23 percent from June 30 to July 1.

In 2016, the average for a 2-ounce beer was up 17 percent, while for a 4-ounce it was up 30 percent.

The increase in beer sales in the last year is driven by a surge of new brands coming online, the AP noted. 

While the rise in alcohol sales has coincided with the increasing popularity of online beer sales, that trend is not reflected in the numbers. 

Dr. John Zuckerman, an alcohol-control specialist and researcher at the University of Pennsylvania’s Miller Center, said he thought that online alcohol sales were actually growing faster than beer sales. 

“Online alcohol sales are booming.

Beer sales are declining, but online sales are still up,” Zuckers said.

“The problem with beer is, it’s a relatively small amount of alcohol compared to what it is in the state of New York.

And, you know, the state that produces a lot of alcohol is also where the number one alcohol drinker in the country is.” 

Zuckerman said that, in a more competitive market, the advertising industry will take a bigger cut.

He said that many states, especially in the Northeast, have raised their minimum alcohol-education requirements and are encouraging businesses to display ads on the Internet to make the message more accessible to consumers. 

But there is concern among some consumers that alcohol advertising could be misleading.

Zucker said that alcohol ads can be misleading because consumers may not know how much alcohol is contained in a drink or if there is any alcohol content in a bottle of beer. 

Zucker said that some advertisers are using the word “alcohol” to mean “alcoholic” in their ads, but he said that’s not the way alcohol is usually portrayed. 

For many consumers, he said, “alcohol is a word that is attached to something they consume.” 

The National Institute for Drug Abuse said that ads are not always appropriate to consumers who are under the influence of drugs. 

There is no evidence that alcohol use is related to higher rates of disease or mortality in adults, it said. 

However, the report said that an increased number of adults are being treated for alcohol-associated conditions such as cancer and diabetes.